Simple Vignette Correction

From wikipedia: In photography and optics, vignetting is a reduction of an image’s brightness or saturation toward the periphery compared to the image center.

When presenting a collection of images as a mosaic, the vignetting in the imagery can cause visual discontinuities at the image borders. Here I present a simple strategy to model and correct the vignette in a collection of images.

Step 1: Compute the pixel-wise average for a set of images

I start by creating 2d numpy array of float32 type with the same dimension as our camera. Each [u, v] position in the numpy array is …
Read the rest... >>

DJI Phantom 4 Pro camera vs. Sony A6000

Recently I flew a DJI Phantom 4 Pro v2 head to head with an in-house (U of MN AEM UAS Lab) developed fixed wing UAS. This comparison isn’t entirely apples to apples, but maybe someone will find it useful.

DJI is the king of the hill for small UAS aerial surveys. Once you figure out the apps and a few basic things, operating one of these is pretty much click and fly and makes aerial survey work about as easy as it can be. Some quick details of our system:

  • Camera horizontal field of view: about 67 degrees.
  • 20 Megapixel

Read the rest... >>

Almost, but not entirely real-time process control with Linux.

First, if you are interested in doing real time process control on Linux, go watch this awesome presentation.  This is way more important than reading my post!  Do it now!

Where was I when all this happened?

From the casual way Sandra speaks of SCHED_FIFO, I feel like this is something just about everyone in the Linux world has known and used in for the last 10 years except for me!  Sadly, I am just hearing about it now, but happily I am hearing about it!  Here is a quick report on what I have learned.

First, what do I


Read the rest... >>

New Hardware Design Project

Feb 11, 2018 update: After some amount of tearing my hair out and some help from the beaglebone IRC community, I have the pocketbeagle UART2 configured and working to my external connector.  Telemetry is up and running!  I also plugged in an SBUS receiver, verified it is getting power correctly, bound it to my transmitter, and then verified the system is seeing my pilot inputs correctly.  Next up: verifying all 8 pwm output channels.

Feb 10, 2018 update: Back to my v2.0 board build.  I soldered on the gps connector and am now getting gps data into the teensy and …
Read the rest... >>

Adventures in Aerial Image Stitching Episode #7

Lens Distortion Issues (or Fun with Optimizers)

For this episode I present a plot of optimized camera locations.   I have a set of 840 images.  Each image is taken from a specific location and orientation in space.  Let us call that a camera pose.  I can also find features in the images and match them up between pairs of images.  The presumption is that all the features and all the poses together create a giant puzzle with only one correct solution.  When all the features are moved to their correct 3d location, when all the cameras are in their correct …
Read the rest... >>

Adventures in Aerial Image Stitching Episode #6

Generating survey area coverage routes

Update: 29 November, 2017:  The work described below has been connected up to the on board autopilot and tested in simulation.  Today I am planning to go out and test with an actual survey aircraft in flight.  I can draw and save any number of areas together as a single project (and create and save any number of projects.)  Once in flight, I can call up a project, select an area, and send it up to the aircraft.  The aircraft itself will generate an optimized route based on planned survey altitude, wind direction, camera field …
Read the rest... >>

Celebrating the 4000th git commit!

Few people really know much about the AuraUAS autopilot system, but this post celebrates the 4000th git commit to the main code repository!

The entire AuraUAS system is hosted on github and can be browsed here:

https://github.com/AuraUAS

AuraUAS traces it’s roots back to a simple open-source autopilot developed by Jung Soon Jang to run on the XBOW MNAV/Stargate hardware back in the 2005-2006 time frame.  I worked at the University of Minnesota at that time and we modified the code to run on an original 400mhz gumtsix linux computer which talked to the MNAV sensor head via a serial/uart connection.…
Read the rest... >>

Aerial Survey Flight (with Augmented Reality)

Basic Details

  • Date: October 11, 2017
  • Location: South Central Ag Lab (near Clay Center, NE)
  • Aircraft: Skywalker 1900 with AuraUAS autopilot system.
  • Wing camera with augmented reality elements added (flight track, astronomy, horizon.)
  • Wind: (from) 160 @ 16 kts (18.5 mph) and very turbulent.
  • Temperature: 65 F (18 C)
  • Target Cruise: 25 kts (~29 mph)

The Full Video

Notes

Here are a couple of comments about the flight.

The conditions were very windy and turbulent, but it was a long drive to the location so we decided the risk of airframe damage was acceptable if we could get good data.…
Read the rest... >>

Spin Testing

Wikipedia Spins: In aviation’s early days, spins were poorly understood and often fatal. Proper recovery procedures were unknown, and a pilot’s instinct to pull back on the stick served only to make a spin worse. Because of this, the spin earned a reputation as an unpredictable danger that might snatch an aviator’s life at any time, and against which there was no defense.

Even in today’s modern world, spins are disorienting and still can be fatal.  This project aims to study spins with a highly instrumented aircraft in order to better understand them, model them, and ultimately create cockpit …
Read the rest... >>

Sunset Flight

This is Skywalker Flight #74, flown on Sept. 7, 2017.  It ended up being a 38.5 minute flight–scheduled to land right at sunset.  The purpose of the flight was to carry insect traps at 300′ AGL and collect samples of what might be flying up at that altitude.

What I like about this flight is that the stable sunset air leads to very consistent autopilot performance.  The circle hold is near perfect.  The altitude hold is +/- 2 meters (usually much better), despite continually varying bank angles which are required to hold a perfect circle shape in 10 kt winds.…
Read the rest... >>